The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths (#13 – Ruth Galloway)

The Lantern Men (Ruth Galloway, #12)

 

The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths 

 Publishing: June 29, 2021 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

 

Previous Book in the Series: #12 – The Lantern Men

 

Reason I chose to Read this Book:  I love this series, the characters, the plots, the author.

 

The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths is the 13th in the Ruth Galloway mystery series.

First, let me thank NetGalley, the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and of course the author, for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

 

Series Background:   (Warning – May contain spoilers from previous books)
Ruth is a Forensic Archaeologist who lives in a rather remote cottage on the edge of the Saltmarsh near Norfolk England. She teaches at the university, and has a daughter (Kate) by DCI Harry Nelson, an already married police officer. Their relationship is complicated. Ruth seems to help solve most of the crimes in the area, as they usually involve the discovery of bones. As well, there is often some aspect of religion in these books. Although Ruth believes in very little, Harry is a lapsed Catholic, their friend Cathbad is a Druid, and all of their families are quite religious.

 

My Synopsis:    (No major reveals, but if concerned, skip to My Opinions)

After two years, Ruth has left Cambridge, and Frank, behind.  She is  back in her home on the Saltmarsh, and now Head of Archaeology at the University of North Norfolk.  She has taken over Phil Trent’s job when he decided to take an early retirement.

She has hired a new lecturer to take over her old post, and she isn’t sure why David Brown annoys her so much.

Nelson calls her to the beach when a body is found by a group of local metal detectorists that call themselves the Night Hawks.  They have also uncovered some Bronze Age artifacts.   She isn’t impressed with this group of amateur archaeologists, but David thinks they are wonderful.

Unfortunately, that will not be the first body that Ruth gets involved with, and when a murder-suicide turn up at a farmhouse which is supposedly haunted by a humongous black dog, Nelson wants Ruth to dig up the backyard.  That farmhouse will involve more death, and Ruth finds herself in danger.

 

My Opinions:

First, these books must be read in order so that you can appreciate the intricate dynamics of each character, and their relationship to the others.

I am so happy that Ruth is back at her old university and the saltmarsh.

You can actually feel the tension every time Ruth and David interact.  It actually made me feel uncomfortable.  The relationship between Ruth and Nelson is again showing promise, and I alternate between hoping they will get together, and liking the status quo.  Since the birth of Nelson and Michelle’s little boy,  Ruth has been somewhat cast aside, but things look like they may change yet again.  Although I am not a romance reader, these people have become family to me, and they all seem to be hurting.

The plot was definitely interesting, and the suspects many.  I love how the local legends always get wound through the stories.

Another fast read, and I can’t wait for the next one.

Read: June, 2021

 

Elly GriffithsAbout The Author:   Elly Griffiths (1963 – ) was born in London England and now lives in Brighton with her husband and two children.  Born Domenica de Rosa, she wrote four books under that name.  As Elly Griffiths she is best known for the Ruth Galloway novels, which were inspired by her husband who trained as an archaeologist, and her aunt who filled her head with myths of the Norfolk coast.

***Photo Taken from GoodReads

 

I have also reviewed this book on GoodReads: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/3741650819

 

Have you read it?  Do you plan to?  Tell me your thoughts…do you agree or disagree with my assessment?  Either way, I’d love to know.

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths (#13 – Ruth Galloway)

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